NATA in Austin

We look forward to seeing you in Austin!

We are planning a great conference and we can’t wait to see you.

Howdy!

We are so excited to be chairing the 2018 NATA Conference. We have been hard at work planning a conference that we hope will supply you with some BIG IDEAS to help you in your growth as an Executive Director. We also have planned activities so that you can socialize and share with your colleagues while experiencing the great city of Austin. Everything is bigger in Texas and this conference is no different. Bigger opportunities to learn and grow. Bigger opportunities to meet Business and Technology Partners. Bigger opportunities to learn from Geniuses. Bigger opportunities to enjoy great food and great friends. Avoid FOMO and join us!

You bring the boots and hats we will provide the Big Ideas.

See Y’all on November 10!

Debbie & Marc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Austin, Texas—November 10 – 14, 2018

AUSTIN FUN FACTS & TRIVIA

Austin is a popular hangout for celebrities like Sandra Bullock, Ryan Gosling, and Elijah Wood. Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant has a house there and apparently likes to haggle cheese prices at the local Whole Foods.

Austin, unlike most of Texas, consists of rolling hill and vistas.

The Hill Country Wine & Food Festival is the biggest such event, second only to Aspen.

If you’re looking for rain in Austin, good luck because Austin is noted for having 300 sun days annually.

Austin, the state capital of Texas was originally called Waterloo.

Austin has the largest urban bat population of any city in the country. Every summer, more than 1.5 million Mexican free-tailed bats roost beneath the Congress Avenue Bridge, flying out at night to feast upon 10,000 to 20,000 pounds of insects.

Did you know that breakfast tacos are the food that define Austin?

Austin’s food truck scene started in the early ‘90s with a few family-owned taco carts on South Lamar Street. The movement took off in the 2000s, and between 2006 and 2011 the number of mobile vendor licenses tripled. Today, there are close to 2,000 food trucks throughout the city.

When it opened in November 1924, University of Texas’s Darrell K. Royal Stadium had a capacity of 27,000, making it one of the largest stadiums in the South. Today, it holds more than 100,000 fans and is the ninth largest stadium in the world.

Austin’s original Moonlight Towers, installed in 1894, are still lighting up the night sky. One of the towers played host to a keg party in the movie Dazed and Confused. In 1993, the city spent $1.3 million dismantling each tower and replacing every bolt and wire in hopes they’ll last at least another hundred years.

The city’s unofficial slogan, “Keep Austin Weird,” originated with local librarian Red Wassenich, who uttered the phrase when he called in to a local radio show in 2000. Since then, the slogan has become a fixture on bumper stickers, store signs, and elsewhere around town. The phrase’s anti-gentrification message has also caught on in other cities, like Louisville, Portland and Indianapolis.

The city’s unofficial slogan, “Keep Austin Weird,” originated with local librarian Red Wassenich, who uttered the phrase when he called in to a local radio show in 2000. Since then, the slogan has become a fixture on bumper stickers, store signs, and elsewhere around town. The phrase’s anti-gentrification message has also caught on in other cities, like Louisville, Portland and Indianapolis.

Austin is the fastest growing city in the U.S., with a population spike of 3% in the past year—a fact bemoaned by the many Austinites who claim the city is losing its character.

There are three artificial lakes surrounding Austin, two of which were formed by dams along the Colorado River. One of them, Lady Bird Lake (formerly Town Lake), was named after the former first lady for her efforts to beautify the area. She had declined the honor while living, so the city named it in her honor after she died in 2007.

One of the city’s earliest live-music venues was Threadgill’s, a filling station and restaurant where country and hillbilly blues bands played for rounds of beer, and where a young Janis Joplin got her start.

Austin is the most populous city in the country without a pro sports team. And there won’t ever be one, if the throngs of University of Texas fans have anything to say about it.

Austin City Limits, the country’s longest-running live music TV show, began broadcasting on October 14, 1974. A then-unknown Willie Nelson was the featured performer.

In addition to “Live Music Capital of the World,” Austin is known as the “Violet Crown City,” a reference to the purplish light cast over the hills on winter evenings.

In 1986, three staffers at The Austin Chronicle hatched an idea for a local festival that would showcase Austin’s prodigious musical talents to the world. The next year, South by Southwest kicked off with just over 700 attendees. Fast forward nearly 30 years, and SXSW has branched out into film and digital media festivals. But the big draw remains the music festival, which attracts more than 2,200 musicians and 28,000 concertgoers to venues throughout the city.

So many tech firms have come to town that Austin now has the nickname “Silicon Hills.” IBM kicked things off in 1967, followed by Texas Instruments, Motorola, 3M, Dell computers, and numerous others. Nowadays, Austin is one of the leading sites for venture capital funding in the nation.

Beginning in 1989, local resident Vince Hanneman began piling hubcaps, bicycle frames, bottles, CDs, air-conditioning vents and other pieces of scrap in his backyard. More than twenty years and numerous zoning disputes later, the Cathedral of Junk is still standing and open to visitors.

OUR PLATINUM PARTNER

OUR GOLD PARTNERS